Operation stashbust part 2

I’m still going with my stashbusting mission: here are a few other recent makes using leftovers and stashed fabrics.

Sewing
Sewing

A raglan tee using up the final tiny piece of jersey left from my feather tunic. I wanted to use every last scrap of this fabric as it’s sooo delicious. The print runs the opposite way to my dress, which I think is actually the correct way as the knit ridges run vertically this way. I didn’t have enough left for the whole top so made up the back with part of a dipped-hem knit skirt that I didn’t like any more (I could even re-use the hem, score), so it was a very thrifty project.

Sewing
Sewing

A super basic ballet dress. I started this ages ago and was dithering on finishing it because I thought it would be a pain to hem. In the end it was fine and I’m glad to have it done. The fabric is a semi-sheer crepe knit from myfabrics which I underlined with white jersey so it’s nice and snuggly. In retrospect I think it would have made a nicer top, but it’s still a cute dress.

Sewing
Sewing

Another crossover-front Scout like my silk one (still probably my most worn make) made in a gauzy voile type woven from Goldhawk Road.

Sewing

A Deer & Doe Plantain tee using some stripy jersey from Goldhawk Road. I can see why this free pattern has been such a hit: it’s so quick to put together and the fit is super great. Plus I fitted this 3/4 sleeve version onto just 1m of fabric. (Have you seen the finalists in the Deer & Doe Plantain contest by the way? So much amazing.)

Sewing

I lacked any contrasting fabric so did the elbow patches on the stripes’ cross-grain, sewn on with a zigzag stitch and walking foot after sticking in place with a glue pen.

Sewing

I tried a new technique for finishing the cuffs and bottom hem: a flatlock seam done completely on the overlocker. Props to Meg for the idea to try this, and this video for a walkthrough of the general technique. Basically you reduce the top needle tension to zero and increase both lower loopers to 8, then sew as you would a blind hem – pressed up once then folded back on itself. Then when you gently tug the seam it falls flat and open with the wide, loose stitch visible from the outside and neat overlocking on the inside. My first attempt is a bit wobbly: in retrospect it would have been much easier to do the hems in the flat before seaming and it was tricky to do the slightly curved hem of the Plantain. But it feels like a really hardwearing and fully stretch-proof hemming method so I’ll definitely give it another go sometime. Anything to avoid the hassle of changing machines all the time tbh.

Sewing

Finally, I had enough jersey scraps left to make matching undies! The perfect scrap-busting project since such a tiny amount of fabric is needed. I used Indigo Orchid’s brilliant free pattern/tutorial and some stretch lace trim bought on eBay. The trim is too wide and these actually turned out too small for me, but they were fun to make so I’ll definitely try again. I just need to take another tip from Meg and make some bras and I might have a truly 100% me-made outfit, eh?

I joke, but the brilliant upshot of all these rather boring stashbust/wardrobe-filler projects is it’s a pretty rare day now that I don’t wear something handmade, which is a great feeling. I am craving some meatier projects next, though: I’ve just had a fresh delivery of delicious new fabrics as a reward for my stashbusting efforts, and I think February will be all about jeans and trousers.

13 thoughts on “Operation stashbust part 2

  1. laglov

    Everyone of these is gorgeous! And wearable! And I can’t help but feel proud every time I see one of you fantastic crossover Scout tees. I wear mine all of the time!

  2. Elena

    Wow! You’ve been so productive! Your crossover front Scouts are so great, and thanks for the tip on hemming the Plantain. Also, you have such beautiful fabrics in your stash. I’m extremely jealous of your heathered knits. They’re gorgeous!

  3. Annie

    These are all ace – especially the raglan tee at the top and those undies (pinning that tutorial for later)! What pattern did you use for the ballet dress? I really like the neckline on it :)

  4. Taracat

    Wow, some amazing stuff here – basics that don’t look like basics. I really love the dress, and your scout variation. And you have inspired me to finally get started on a plantain.

  5. Youanna

    I cannot make myself pay for tops anymore, now that I know I can make them for a fraction of that price tag that everybody else pays. I love your ballet dress!

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