Category Archives: Indie patterns

Trials of the Trend Trousers

I spent the Easter bank holiday weekend tackling a heck of a project – some Trend Patterns TPC 12 Utility Trousers. It wasn’t easy but we survived and having road-tested these pants in the following weeks I feel they were worth the effort. I’m especially enjoying wearing them twinning as a black crayon with my cat, who wanted to join me for these photos yesterday.

I’m typically loath to spend £20 on a pattern but I couldn’t get Shauni’s gorgeous version out of my head and as an almost permanent member of the trouser-wearing brigade these days (seriously, never wear dresses any more) I’m always looking for ones with interesting design details to add my my collection.

I guess with Trend – one of the more high-fashion-forward indies out there – you are paying for the drafting and design rather than lovely hand-holding guidance (or indeed an inclusive size range – my hip measurement skims the largest size on the chart). I’d already been forewarned by Charlie, who has also just made an excellent pair, that the instructions were on the skimpy side, and got an extra sense from spending an entire evening cutting the many pieces out on a single layer that it wasn’t going to be a walk in the park kind of make. To that end I procrastinated on getting started – but when I did, while there were painful bits here and there, I did have finished trousers after two half-day sewing sessions.

Fit-wise things were quite straightforward. I cut a 14 based on my hip measurement and it was easy enough to bring in the waist at the centre back and side seams to fit my smaller measurement there. There’s a nice curvy waistband so no gaping and the length is great. The only thing I altered as I went was to lop two inches off the rise as I didn’t want that super-high/super-long-crotch look. I did this straight from the waistline but I’ll alter the pattern to take it off lower down (and maybe add back half an inch) for next time. I could possibly also size down generally but I do like how comfortable these are.

The rest of the pattern however…. there were certainly parts that were cool and interesting to sew – like the origami-folded vents and an unusual but smart and intuitive fly/waistband construction – I feel like some improvements would make all the difference to the overall usability and enjoyment of this pattern, such as:

– The order of some of the steps made things harder than they needed to be at times. For example, you are instructed to close the outseam before finishing the leg topstitching and vent construction. That makes it harder to manoeuvre under the machine to reach the vents as it’s a little leg-shaped tube. There’s no reason not to sew the side seams after the vents are in which would make access much easier.
– The pattern pieces aren’t numbered and many have really similar names, which makes it hard to know which one to pick up and use at each point. Or indeed to accidentally sew (+ trim + understitch) the ‘front facing’ onto the pants instead of the ‘front fly facing’ #askmehowiknow. Similarly, notches and marks which are referenced in the instructions like the vent stop point are not labelled on the pattern either.
– The instructions have photographs for some steps, but they’re on a cream garment with white stitching so you can’t really tell what’s going on. Sometimes what’s caught in the shot doesn’t really help either e.g. if the fly one was more zoomed out I might have seen I had the wrong piece but it was a fairly useless close-up of the bottom end.
– The written instructions are needlessly confusing and need a proofread. Why write ‘attach’ ‘mount’ ‘close’ etc when you just mean ‘sew’?
– Some finishing-off type steps are not covered so a bit of judicious gap-filling is needed. Like anchoring the end of the fly and the unsecured edges of the waistband facing.

The Fly of Pain

And here are a few extra tips which if you make the pattern you might want to consider too:
– It’s generally not necessary to pre-overlock the raw edges as instructed. I did it as I went which I much prefer; much less tedious.
– I would recommend pressing in creases for the hem and vents while they’re still flat as you will lose your notches after overlocking the raw edges.
– I would certainly toile or wearable-toile to get the fit and construction down before cutting into good fabric. I used a fairly cheap cotton-linen from Abakhan and it got a bit battered from unpicking in places, though I am glad these are definitely wearable.

For all my gripes about the instructions, I did mostly enjoy this project and I really like the finished pants! They feel cool yet comfy and super wearable – they’re gone into regular rotation since Easter even though the cotton-linen I used creases like a mf so needs constant ironing. I especially love those leg vents, which I’ve tried to show in motion above. I think a white denim pair would be pretty cool and I’m sure it will all go easier the second time around.

Creamy True Bias Yari jumpsuit for spring

I toiled the True Bias Yari Jumpsuit last year sometime and for whatever reason (…winter, I guess) had a massive delay before picking it up again. But then I saw Sarah’s winter-white version and this Asos cutie and got on the lookout for creamy fabric to make my own. Just in time for spring, hint hint weather.

I cut a straight size 12 for the toile to fit my hip measurement but the top half turned out way too baggy, so this time I cut an 8 graded to 10 at the hip. It’s actually still turned out quite loose through the leg so a straight 8 probably would have been fine. I could possibly benefit from a small FBA on top, which would be easy to add through the princess seams next time. I love how flat the crisply-faced neckline lies though and there’s no gaping even with only three buttons. (The buttons are vintage milk glass from my endless stash. )

I was going for a relaxed silhouette but tried the suit on partway through construction and decided it did need waist definition. Also the crotch and pockets were hanging very low like it was too long in the body. I didn’t fancy the side D-ring ties included in the pattern – they look a bit awkward and unflattering to me – so I sewed a drawstring channel to the inside waistline and made skinny ties to feed through. The slight blousing effect this resulted in also fixed the length issue!

Here’s the channel from the inside. Mmm, I love all these creamy stitch tones against each other.

The only other tweak I made was to level off the top of the pockets to straight rather than slanted, to match the Asos inspiration suit better. I like that the deep hem at the top of the pockets matches the width of the little cap sleeve cuffs. This pattern was lovely to sew overall and unusually for me I followed the given directions almost completely, adjustments aside.

I grabbed the fabric with exactly this project in mind on a recent trip to the wonderful Abakhan in Manchester, a pre-cut piece of slubby cotton-linen blend that reminds me of silk noil costing about £8 for around 2.5m – in Abakhan you pay by weight so I wasn’t sure of yardage at the time. With creative cutting I could just squeeze the Yari pieces on (3m is the recommended yardage).

I got some of this fabric in black too and I’m tempted to use it to make a Yari sister as I reckon this will get a lot of wear as soon as it warms up a little.

Philippa pants: fitting and adding a ‘tummy stay’

After a few sewing fails in a row (some Lander pants in a frankly hideous fabric choice, a vintage jumpsuit that looked 80s in the wrong way, some patchwork jeans that looked straight-up weird) I was so happy to finish these trousers and be 100% in love with them. They are Anna Allen Philippa pants in a stretch corduroy from Minerva, which I received as part of being in their blogger network. My main blog post about the pants will be going up over there later, but I thought I’d go into a bit more detail on the fitting and construction process over here.

I don’t often toile patterns but I did in this case as I wasn’t at all sure what size to cut and thought I may need some adjustments to cover the size difference between my waist and hips on such a close fitting design. The pattern comes with a complete separate booklet of useful fitting tips and I also sought some very helpful advice on Instagram.

The main consensus pointed to a full stomach adjustment, reducing the crotch depth, and giving more space in the thigh.

Thanks in particular to Evelyn @slowintention who sent me these diagrams showing how she did the full thigh and full stomach adjustments.

Toile 3 – which repurposed the aforementioned horrible-fabric Landers by the way. What was I thinking. Pinching out the crotch wrinkles with pins.

Over the course of three toiles I made the following adjustments:
– 1” full stomach adjustment (I added space both horizontally and vertically as you can see in the main slashed areas above)
– Graded up a size at the inner front thigh, tapering in again towards the knee
– Took 1” off the rise all around, and wedged a further 3/4” out of the crotch curve at the lengthen/shorten line
– Scooped out the back crotch a bit at the seat (low butt adjustment)
– Omitted the back darts completely (?!)
– Sewed the outer leg seams at a 3/4” seam allowance, mainly to compensate for the stretch in my fabric
– Shortened the leg length by 1″
– Converted the waistband from straight to curved (a tutorial is included in the pattern for this; I only needed it because I lowered the rise to where my body curves in). I sewed cotton tape into the top seam of the waistband to prevent stretching over time.

The fit is still not perfect! There are some diagonal drag lines on the back leg and there is excess fabric bunching around my knees – I was focusing on the waist/hip area and only toiled down to the mid thigh. The grainline seems a bit twisted too which I wonder is down to maintaining the straight side seams. But I don’t really mind! They’re crazy comfortable and I think they’re the kind of trouser that will need minor adjustment each time it’s sewn due to fabric variances.

I pretty much went my own way with the construction. I cut-on the fly facing pieces to the main front leg and used my preferred Sandra Betzina method to do a zip fly instead of the button fly as in the pattern. I’m proud of this fly front, it’s super flat and I interfaced the surrounding area inside to keep it sturdy. The cool matte black button came as a spare with a RTW pair of jeans!

I also decided to add a sort of tummy-tuck stay piece into the front for a bit of firmness in this area – similar to a pocket stay/holster but as these have no front pockets it’s just a layer of self fabric. I used the front pieces to draft them off and anchored into the fly and side seams as they were sewn. I stretched the pieces a little as I sewed them in and I think this really helps in smoothing out the front area.

Next time I sew this pattern I will try using a non-stretch fabric as recommended, but this pair is so comfortable and I’m pleased with the fit I ended up with.

Spring Landers

I… I think we can finally call spring being here? I’ve packed away my coat and jumpers at least, and I’ve made a spring-y version of my favourite trousers.

Making a second pair of True Bias Lander pants has been on my to-do list for ages. I wear my first pair all the time, but they’re made of quite a thick denim and it’s getting a little too warm for them (hurrah!). My heart got set on an ivory/cream pair, and to that end first off I bought some needlecord which unfortunately proved too this and rather see through. I tried dyeing them but they just turned out patchy and weird. Into the scraps bin they went.

After sulking a bit I ordered some Robert Kaufman Ventana twill from fabric.com, since it’s the fabric Kelli used in all the pattern samples. Ordering from this US-based site from the UK is easy enough by the way and shipping isn’t too costly. I did have to pay £10 in customs and deal with the ungodly nightmare that is UPS delivery; it’s really cheap and has a great range though, so it kinda evens out!


The cotton Ventana twill is indeed a good match for the pattern; I would actually call it light-medium weight rather than fabric.com’s medium/heavy description, which I think is why it creases a bit readily. There is still a bit of pocket and seam-allowance show through but not enough to bother me this time. I decided to convert the patch pockets to inside pockets, which Kelli has a tutorial for, though now I’ve seen them I think I prefer the original pockets to break up my expense of hip, hah.

I’m hoping these will be just as wearable as my denim ones for spring and summer, though being of the clumsy/messy variety we’ll see how long they stay white! I have lots of other sewing plans for the warmer months – most definitely including Kelli’s newest pattern, the Yari jumpsuit.

Persephone pants

It’s not often I buy new patterns nowadays, but I fell hard for the Persephone Pants pattern as soon as Sophie posted them on Instagram. I snapped it up despite a general unwillingness to both buy from ‘untested’ indie designers and to buy a pattern I could hack fairly easily from existing ones, and ended up pretty glad I did.


Mostly I was curious: how on earth can you fit pants with no side seam, especially on a shape like mine where my waist-to-hip measurement spans four sizes on the size chart? I asked the designer Anna on Instagram and she recommended to cut the size to fit my hip – a 14 in my case – then use the back darts to bring in the waist. Plus an extra dart can be added where the side seam would be if needed.

When I basted up the pants I found that pinching an extra inch-and-a-bit out of each dart gave me a fairly snug fit at the waist without distorting the lines too much. Also, as I sewed on the waistband I eased it in pretty tightly to give a bit more hold and cut off the excess at the end. My final waistband length ended up at the size 8 finished measurement which is in line with my waist size, and overall the fit is pretty nice and super comfortable. Nifty!


I used The Fabric Store’s heavyweight linen in Toffee, the same fabric I used in pink for my jeans. A sturdier fabric such as canvas or rigid denim is recommended, and I think that might help with the slight issue I have of the button fly front wanting to pull apart a bit. This is one of those colours that I’m always drawn to – in this case heavily inspired by this picture – while always forgetting it’s not really in my preferred colour sphere for wearing. We’ll see if I end up reaching for them often, but navy or dark green would probably have been a more sensible choice.



Making them was seriously fun and I was incredibly impressed with the pattern. I love making trousers anyway but these have all sorts of little details to make things interesting and satisfying. The instructions are among the best I’ve used for ages and you’re thoroughly guided through seam finishes and topstitching etc to get a really clean and detailed result. The designer Anna Allen was apparently working on this pattern for a year, and it shows! It’s very professional and I didn’t once feel my usual urge to deviate and use different techniques.

The inevitable question is how do these compare to the other high-waist wide-leg pants patterns out there, for example the Landers or M7445 to name two I’ve sewn up before? I think the Persephones are definitely unique enough to have a seat at the table, the main design and fit differences being:

– These are truly high waisted! I have quite a high natural waist so the Landers and M6445 don’t come to my belly button, but these cover it.
– No side seam; the legs are one big wraparound piece. Pretty kool.
– A concealed button fly which is very fun (and easy!) to sew.
– You can’t really tell from the samples or line drawings, but they have super cute little pockets tucked into the waistline at the front.
– Of all three patterns, they’re the snuggest at the hip/thigh area (I upsized to be sure they’d fit but I think they should fit a little tighter) but I think the widest at the hem circumference.
– They have been compared to the cultish Jesse Kamm sailor pants which seems fair, as even the topstitching on the waistband and crotch is the same. But y’know, not $400.

If I was to make them again I think I’d size down to a 12 hip / 6 waist as these have grown a little already (and I’m trying to lose a few spare winter pounds) and I prefer my high waisted pants a little snug. I’d also use a studier fabric as recommended and take an inch or so off the hems. I just bought some cream needlecord which is a toss-up between becoming these or a second pair of Landers.

Shout-out to my new Clarks shoes btw, which I already bought in two colours and am trying to resist the third…

It’s turtles all the way down

After cracking out my coat, here are some simpler sews ready for winter – lots of knits, built-in neckwarmers, and some bonus cosy pants. First up, this is a Papercut Rise, in a lovely grey marl rib that I’ve had in my stash for a while – I think it was from Woolcrest. I made this pattern up twice ages ago and both succumbed to washing fails, so I’m glad to have a new one (and to have learnt to never tumble-dry my handmades!)

This is a Sew House Seven Toaster 1 sweater. There are loads of lovely versions of this pattern in blogland but I think it was Heather’s gorgeous classic cream version that made me buy it. For a more shrunken fit I cut a size small, took a couple of inches off the body and sleeves, and brought in the neckline for a slightly closer fitting turtleneck. The neck sort of collapses because this fabric is pretty fine and drapey, but I still like how it looks. I used the reverse of the fabric – a soft knit with a slightly brushed back, also from Woolcrest I think – for most of the body, and the ‘right’ side for the cuffs and hem for a bit of subtle contrast. This pattern is so fast and has zero hemming, hurrah!

And for a bit of variety, this is Toaster with no turtle! Made from a lovely lilac marled sweatshirting from MyFabrics, with matching ribbing for the hem and cuff bands. I’m very into both cropped sweatshirts and pastel colours at the moment – rather new for me but I think these tones are actually pretty good on my colouring – so this sweater is ticking a lot of boxes.

Do you like my Pusheen mermaid socks :D

These trousers are the Style Arc Joni. I made these for a very specific use case: when you get home from work and immediately have to shrug off your awful constricting day clothes – lovely and well-fitting and handmade as they may be – and wriggle back into super comfy but definitely indoor-appropriate-only sweats or pyjamas. This pattern attracted me because they’re a bit elevated from basic track pants by the twisted lower leg seams, faux topstitched fly and little front tucks, but still pyjama-comfortable.

This pattern is easy as pie, only made a little more tricky by the drapey and stretchy quality of the fabric I used – a luxurious modal terry again from MyFabrics, again with matching ribbing for the waistband and cuffs. I’m a convert to investing in proper ribbing, it really makes it easier to get nice snug cuffs and neckbands and I think makes projects look more RTW.

I made them exactly as patterned with no fitting alterations; I could stand to take an inch or so off the leg but I don’t mind the slight slouch around the deep cuff that the extra length brings. I think I could even get away with wearing these to work on a casual/hungover sort of day. Come at me, winter!

P.S This post’s title refers to one of my favourite anecdotes