Category Archives: Finished items 2017

Burda 7017 in cupro silk

I’ve had this lovely fabric earmarked for trousers for ages, and I dug out an old pattern to make ’em happen. They are Burda 7017, which are amongst some of the earliest trouser projects I ever tackled a few years ago, and now unfortunately seems to be out of print. I wouldn’t exactly say it’s embarrassing to look back at those earlier garments, but it was nice to revisit this pattern with all I’ve learned about fit, technique and fabric choices since then and see the improvements.

Having said that though, I averted a near-disaster on this pair when, after executing a lovely fly front completely from memory, I sewed up the side seams and found that I could barely squeeze myself into them. I don’t think I’ve gained a great deal of weight in the intervening years but perhaps I previously traced the pattern with extra safety seam allowance that never made it back to the paper pattern. Whoops.

After sulking for a bit I unpicked and re-sewed every single seam – inner and outer leg, the centre back and centre front below the fly – with a tiny little seam allowance, basically right next to the overlocked edge. That provided just enough extra room to allow them to fit, albeit a little slimmer than I was shooting for. I still don’t think I’ll feel too confident cycling in them in case it puts too much strain on those tiny seam allowances and they split open, but at least they feel comfortable and I can move in them.

I think the fabric makes this pair quite special and is the main reason why I was so relieved to save the fit: it’s a cupro-silk from the famous stall outside Sainsbury’s in Walthamstow market. I bought it over a year ago on a shopping trip with some other sewers; Marilla made up her Bennett dress pattern in it. I’m not sure if ‘cupro silk’ means that it’s a fibre blend or a cupro designed to look like silk, but it’s the most beautiful terracotta colour with a sort of dimensional shimmer and a slightly slubby texture, feels deliciously cool and floppy to wear, and was a dream to work with. I don’t think I’ll find fabric of this nature easily again unfortunately though I’ll definitely be keeping an eye out.

I tried out a little tweak I wanted to test based on some ready-to-wear trousers that I love of inserting elastic into the back waistband to maintain a snug, flexible fit at the waistline. To do this I eliminated the darts from the pants back and added their takeup to the length of the waistband, then stitched in some 1″ non-roll elastic before sealing up the inner waistband. It worked out great so I’m going to retrospectively add elastic to my old black cotton 7017s that have stretched out and become too baggy at the waist, which will help ping them back to life.

Final guts shots to show the waistband, that lovely fly front, and those tiny seams…

Tropical NL 6493

Summer wedding season has opened, and this is a New Look 6493 jumpsuit I made for the first occasion. I really like this final garment, but I did have some difficulties getting there with the pattern!

I didn’t toile or make any prior adjustments because I thought the pattern’s princess seams would give a chance to fine-tune fit as I went. I cut a smaller size in the bodice than the trousers after checking out the finished garment measurements, but the bodice still turned out way too large and flashed an alarming amount of skin! Upon re-checking the line art on the back of the pattern envelope you can see the back is intentionally drafted very low, but it was also baggy under the arms and on the wrap front too. The ease and wrap is necessary to let you pull on the jumpsuit without fastenings, but personally I think it would have been very difficult to wear as drafted, so it seems a poor design decision. (Also what’s with the random knit crop-top pattern included? Are you supposed to wear that underneath?!)

I ended up fixing it by overlapping both the front and back a couple of inches more than patterned, hiking up the straps a considerable amount and taking in the side seams, then lightly gathering the trouser waistband in the newly-smaller bodice so they still lined up. I put a little safety pin through the front neckline to keep it in place and could also do the same in the back, however for the wedding I just left it loose and cowl-like (and went braless!).

At least the fabric was well-behaved, a lovely lightweight poly crepe from Minerva, and the print hides where I had to fudge around with the fit on the bodice, hah.

This was really nice to wear to a warm evening wedding: the elastic waist meant it was super comfortable and even braless I felt very secure in the top after all the tweaks. I’m not sure I’ll make this pattern up again as I don’t think the bodice design is worth tinkering with to fix and the very low back means it’d be difficult to wear in the daytime (I might try layering a tee under it though). However I do really like the fit in the trousers – especially the single-piece pockets which were deep enough to hold my phone and cards so no bag required, hurrah – so I might splice on a simpler cami bodice for more summery jumpsuit fun.

Faux jumpsuit

Oooh, this weekend’s project is one of my favourites for a while. It’s a fake jumpsuit, i.e. actually separates made up in the same fabric – Named’s Ninni culottes mashed up with Grainline’s Tiny Pocket Tank.


I wasn’t going to buy the Ninni pattern as it’s so simple and I’ve hacked this sort of wide elastic-waist pant before, but I just love their drafting and it was only 10 euros for the PDF. I was glad for the purchase as everything about the drafting is just right for me: the rise, width, waistband etc. I’m happy to pay 10 euros for someone else to deliver me what I want!

Sewing them up was fast and easy, except the part where I dozily sewed the back to back and front to front at the side seams instead of a back to a front, and had to unpick it all, on BOTH legs. Don’t sew when hungover, kids.

I was going to be extra-lazy and graft the leg pieces together as the outer side seam is pretty much straight, but decided I wanted the inseam pockets. I’ve tacked across the pocket top and bottom to try and keep them facing forwards.

The Tiny Pocket pattern doesn’t seem to be available any more; it was Grainline’s first-ever downloadable pattern and I assume the Willow tank has replaced it in the line-up. It’s a real nice well-drafted basic so I’m glad to have it in my PDF stash.

Guts shot; I’m proud I got the binding so neat and flat because this fabric was so difficult to press. I actually self-drafted an all-in-one facing but didn’t have enough fabric left to cut it and no suitable plain stash fabric; there was only just enough left to cut a few bias strips! I sewed the armhole binding flat before French-seaming the side seams, and the neckline binding was done in the round.

The fabric is a poly crepe from Minerva Crafts. Their description of it is spot on: it’s a dream to sew with (apart from not taking a press very well), has a little comfy stretch, is pretty much opaque but very lightweight with a wonderful drape. I love it! I got my culottes and top out of the two metres with very little scraps to spare.

I’m thrilled with these separates; I can see myself wearing them all summer both together and mixed up with other garments.

Ogden camis, and a different construction method

It’s been deliciously warm in London this last week, with more nice weather forecast. A good chance to dig out the True Bias Ogden cami pattern and make use of some remnants I’ve bought lately.

I first made this dress version in some great stretch cotton-viscose that I bought from the Cloth House Camden warehouse shop just this last week. I got the last metre on the roll which was just enough to lengthen the Ogden into a mini dress. To do that I just extended the side seams down by about 9″ (the total length armsyce to hem is 24″) maintaining the flared angle. I’ve been after a basic black slip for ages and I think it’ll work well with a tee underneath when the weather inevitably dips again.

I made another one pretty quickly in this adorable cat-print polyester remnant that I got in Tokyo. I refined the fit a little bit around the top; basically darting out a bit of gaping on both the front and back. I also came up with a revised construction method which I think is a little faster and easier than the the instructions, so I took some photos and wrote up how I did it below. It’s quite similar to my facing tutorial in that the front and back are constructed before sewing them into the ’round’. Here we go – sorry the photos aren’t very good but shout if you have a question.

Complete steps 1-3 to staystitch and create/baste the straps. (…Except I don’t staystitch or baste, because I am a REBEL.) Now instead of sewing the side seams next, pin and sew the front facing to the front bodice across the top edge, securing the straps in the process.

Trim, clip and understitch per the instructions.

Now, lay out and layer up the pieces as follows: back facing right side facing UP; the loose strap ends (attached to the front bodice) right sides facing UP; back bodice, right side DOWN. Again you could baste the straps to the back only here first but I just deal with all three layers at once.

Pin, sew, and trim/clip/understitch the top edge just like the front. Turn right side out and give it all a good press – you’ll have a funny side-seam-less cami joined by the straps as above. Now is a good time to finish the lower facing edges – I just pinked mine – and to add a label to the back facing, as otherwise it’s hard to tell which way round to wear it!

Now to finish the side seams: open up the facing again so the right sides touch. Pin and sew the bodice and facing as one long side seam.

Finish the seam as desired, snip a notch where the facing and bodice meet to reduce bulk, and press seams open.

Turn out, press and ditch-stitch the facing down to the side seam to keep it in place. Alternatively, you could also treat the facing and bodice as one and do a French seam, catching both layers and meaning the facing gets anchored into the side seam. Hem the bottom and you’re good to go!

Akinori Kimono in Japanese florals

I have three weddings to attend in the space of a month starting mid-July, so I’m getting ahead on making some pretty dresses to wear to them! This one is the Wardrobe By Me Akinori kimono dress, and in pleasing synergy I bought the fabric on my recent trip to Tokyo, Japan.

Danish indie pattern company Wardrobe By Me were a new find to me. I can’t even remember where I first saw this pattern but the PDF got snapped up as soon as I clocked the line drawing. I love the wrapover front with soft pleats, cut-on sleeves and integrated tie belt.

Sewing it up was crazy fun, and very fast. It’s not nearly as complicated as it looks, with just four main pattern pieces plus the ties and facings. The pattern has some clever construction details, like a cut-on facing for the front neckline which simply gets folded inwards and connected to a separate back neck facing to make an elegant topstitch-free finish. It was also fun to sew up the semicircular waist detail at the front, cleverly constructed in a such a way that all raw edges are concealed inside.

The PDF is a manageable 23 pages, with instructions to self-draft the ties rather than needlessly print a large piece, a detail I always appreciate. The instructions are great too; I would say geared towards non-complete beginners as only the trickier aspects include illustrations. The only thing I thought was missing was a direction to finish the raw facing edge, which I did early on before basting to the semicircle panel.


I made a straight size 8 with no adjustments and the fit is perfect. Just a note that the given final hip measurement in the pattern booklet is wrong; as written it appears as if it has negative ease but actually there is about 10″ ease in the hips. 2.7m of fabric is recommended but I squeezed it into 2m with a few liberties taken where grainlines were concerned. (If you look closely, my inset waist panel has flowers growing sideways – whoops…)

The fabric is a polyester that’s doing a pretty damn good job of imitating sandwashed silk. At least I don’t think it’s real silk by the price I paid for it in the Okadaya fabric store in Shinjuku; it wasn’t more than £6 a metre. Not all polys are created equal; this one is slinky and drapey yet was remarkably well-behaved to work with. The sandwash effect gave some grippiness and it pressed well with no melting or plastic smells.

The ties can also be omitted, which gives a really nice loose but still shapely fit, and are long enough to wrap around to the front to tie there too.

I’m thrilled with this dress; it was such a nice sew and perfect for a summer wedding. I’m plotting a daytime version of the Akinori now, perhaps in an ikat cotton or chambray without the ties.

Lovely Reeta (in Spoonflower)

My current Named pattern streak continues: this is my first take on the Reeta midi shirt dress pattern from their latest spring-summer collection. It features a lined back yoke, camp style collar, a drawstring waist, pleated patch pockets and side splits.

Before I talk about the pattern, the excellent fabric: it’s Spoonflower‘s poly crepe de chine, which they sent me for free to review. Spoonflower describes this substrate as “a sheer, lightweight 100% polyester crepe fabric ideal for projects that require a soft drape and a delicate weight. This exciting fabric features bright colors that hold up very well to multiple washings”. My own impressions are that the colours are indeed how I expected and the print is sharp – it didn’t fade in my prewash and I wouldn’t expect it to in future washes. It’s opaque enough for a dress and drapes very well, yet isn’t overly shifty and difficult to handle. You will want to use a fine needle and silk pins as it does show stitching marks/holes quite clearly.

It feels just a a little plastic-y (I’d be interested to try their silk CdC sometime), but it took a steamy medium-heat press very well and doesn’t feel too sticky to wear, especially in this breezy style. The major benefit of Spoonflower of course is that you have access to a huge user-generated library of prints to pick from: I went for this Mudcloth-inspired print by domesticate. They ship directly from Berlin now too, so it’s much cheaper to order and get delivery to the UK (and no customs charges, for now at least, hurrah). Thanks to Spoonflower for sending me the fabric; I’ll definitely be ordering more sometime soon.

Onto the pattern itself: as you might have noticed, my version actually eschews a lot of these lovely features that attracted me to the design in the first place. I made the silly mistake of starting this project on Saturday morning hoping to have it ready to wear for a friend’s birthday drinks in the evening. Cutting it took an age due to all the pieces and the grudging desire to match this print I chose, so I was generally trying to rush and ended up getting quite frustrated and slapdash.

For some reason my collar piece ended up a good inch too short to fit between the notches on the neckline – I need to check if that was user or pattern error (likely me in the aforementioned rush). But the pattern luckily works just fine with no collar and just the folded-back lapels. I made up the pleated pockets and pinned them on, but decided they were too much fuss for this print. I ended up shortening the skirt about eight inches which made the splits look a bit silly, so I sewed the entire side seams closed. It was close to maxi length on me before I chopped it, which actually looked rather nice, albeit a bit much in this print.

In terms of fit, I made a straight 40 and it’s spot on. I especially like the sleeve drafting, they’re very comfortable and eased-in very nicely. The waist and hips are blousy and open so overall as long as the shoulder and upper back is good this should be an easy one to fit.
Fit aside, this is actually rather an involved sew and has some tricky steps, hence why even speedy sewer me did not get it finished in a day. The instructions are good but I did end up deviating a bit to finish the enclosed yoke and sleeve cuffs my own way. I sewed real buttons and buttonholes but feel obligated to point out that it does slip on over the head, so you could definitely be lazy and sew the buttons straight through both layers. It’s not my neatest work overall but the design and fabric are quite forgiving luckily!